Category: Results of citizen science

Mountain goats’ winter coats: What can people-powered research tell us about patterns and phenology of molt?

This blog post originally appeared on the Ecology and Evolution blog, published by Wiley. It was re-posted here in it’s entirety with permission. Read the full published research paper here. By Katarzyna Nowak, Aerin Jacob, Shane Richards, Don Reid, and Greg Newman. Featured image shows one of the “crown jewels” of our camera trapping season

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Six Months after Earth Day: Collaborations Around Six Citizen Science Grand Challenge Questions through Earth Challenge 2020

By Alex Long, Sarah J Newman & Anne Bowser  This blog first appeared on the Wilson Center blog on December 10, 2020. We’ve reposted it here with permission. April 22, 2020 marked the 50th anniversary of Earth Day. While original plans of a large-scale celebration and campaign around citizen science required rethinking and adjustment, the movement that is Earth Day

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Is Rainwater Safe to Drink? Runoff Collected by Volunteers Offers Clues

A citizen science project called Off the Roof tested rainwater runoff collected by volunteers. They found that rainwater can be easily treated, but does often have contaminants similar to what’s found in streams and rivers. This blog first appeared in the Citizen Science Salon, a partnership between Discover and SciStarter.org, on 2 Oct 2020. It

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How Citizen Science Paved the Way for This Student’s Career

When Brian Fauver set foot on the Colorado State University campus as a new graduate student in 2013, he never expected he’d coauthor a paper in the journal Nature three years later. His research journey began typically enough but the work that led to that Nature publication gave Brian “an expanded worldview of what science

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Results-based Citizen Science

Citizen science starts with an idea All citizen science and community science projects begin as ideas. Perhaps you work for a city and are interested in how local greenspaces support pollinators. Or maybe you’re a researcher trying to understand how invasive plants spread. Or you’re a member of your community concerned about how activities affect

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